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Celebrity Families: Eating and Playing in Style

Celebrity Families: Eating and Playing in Style

The Affecks, the Damons, the Rossdales—the gang is all here!

Tom Brady plays with his boys Ben and John.

Some of the most popular celebrity families are always out and about, either eating at local hot spots or taking their kids on adventures around the world. Whether they’re known for their culinary expertise or not, celebrity families certainly know how to dine in style, both around the globe and in their hometowns.

Since many A-list celebrity families — from movie stars to models to musicians — have younger children, the parents often like to take some alone-time and go out on date nights. For these romantic dinners, they frequent hot spots like Mr. Chow in Los Angeles or Sam’s by the Beach in Santa Monica, Calif. When the kids are in tow, families visit other famous restaurants like Blue Ribbon Sushi or Extra Virgin in Manhattan.

Victoria and David Beckham often bring their kids with them on vacation, and when they visited the Eiffel Tower, they dined at its picturesque restaurant, Le Jules Verne. And power couple Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt are often spotted toting along their clan in cities worldwide.

Although bringing along their lot of six may seem like a daunting task, they make it look easy — while staying fashionable on top of it all.

Regardless of what they’re doing, celebrity families take advantage of time spent together, and look great while doing it. And even though they’re growing up in the public eye, the kids of famous parents get to experience some great places (and food!) with their families.

Take a cue from these celebrity families, and read on to see where they go to eat, and where they like to take their kids!


Tik-cook: Celebrity food stars share TikTok recipes

MANILA, Philippines &mdash Erwan Heussaff recently gained "rockstar" status on social media as it was revealed that he donated $2,000 in a community pantry initiative.

The restaurateur and vlogger has also conquered another platform where his culinary skills and expertise has earned him a following.

He's among the must-follow kitchen-savvy stars on TikTok. Apart from him, Marvin Agustin, KC Concepcion and Ninong Ry have also gained fans. Find out what made them stars of TikTok.


A family cookbook that makes healthy eating possible–even on weeknights.

All parents know what a struggle mealtime can–you want to prepare healthy dishes for your family, but picky eaters, busy schedules, and way-too-long ingredient lists always seem to stand in your way. CLEAN EATING FOR BUSY FAMILIES [Fair Winds Press, March 2019, $21.99 US/$28.99 CAN] takes the challenge out of putting delicious food on the table on a nightly basis by providing you with a clear plan for dinner success. In this revised and expanded version of the popular original, you’ll also find even more recipes and photos, streamlined weekly grocery lists, and practical tips for healthy family eating.

How Does it Work?

  • IT’S QUICK: From easy sautés and casseroles, to slow-cooker and one-pan meals, all the recipes you’ll find inside list both mode and length of cooking time, so there’s no time wasted trying to calculate the timing for your schedule. Plus, most recipes can be prepared in 30 minutes or less!
  • IT’S CLEAN: The ever-growing “clean food” movement, which focuses on a healthy, whole foods-based approach to eating, lies at the foundation of this book, so you can be sure you’re feeding your family the very best. From wholesome ingredient lists to a nutritional analyses on every recipe, you can feel confident that every meal you prepare is both nutrient-rich and calorie-conscious. Options for plant-based, gluten-free, and dairy-free alternatives are also listed wherever possible.
  • IT’S GREEN: Featuring eco-friendly tips, along with information on how to go green while shopping and cooking, you’ll find it a cinch to keep your family happy and stay eco-conscious.

And most importantly…it’s delicious! From Quick-Fix Trail Mix Snack Bars to One-Pan Chicken Parmesan with Spinach, you’ll enjoy night after night of delicious home cooking–without any of the hassle. Satisfy your whole family with nourishing meals they’ll love with CLEAN EATING FOR BUSY FAMILIES.


A family cookbook that makes healthy eating possible–even on weeknights.

All parents know what a struggle mealtime can–you want to prepare healthy dishes for your family, but picky eaters, busy schedules, and way-too-long ingredient lists always seem to stand in your way. CLEAN EATING FOR BUSY FAMILIES [Fair Winds Press, March 2019, $21.99 US/$28.99 CAN] takes the challenge out of putting delicious food on the table on a nightly basis by providing you with a clear plan for dinner success. In this revised and expanded version of the popular original, you’ll also find even more recipes and photos, streamlined weekly grocery lists, and practical tips for healthy family eating.

How Does it Work?

  • IT’S QUICK: From easy sautés and casseroles, to slow-cooker and one-pan meals, all the recipes you’ll find inside list both mode and length of cooking time, so there’s no time wasted trying to calculate the timing for your schedule. Plus, most recipes can be prepared in 30 minutes or less!
  • IT’S CLEAN: The ever-growing “clean food” movement, which focuses on a healthy, whole foods-based approach to eating, lies at the foundation of this book, so you can be sure you’re feeding your family the very best. From wholesome ingredient lists to a nutritional analyses on every recipe, you can feel confident that every meal you prepare is both nutrient-rich and calorie-conscious. Options for plant-based, gluten-free, and dairy-free alternatives are also listed wherever possible.
  • IT’S GREEN: Featuring eco-friendly tips, along with information on how to go green while shopping and cooking, you’ll find it a cinch to keep your family happy and stay eco-conscious.

And most importantly…it’s delicious! From Quick-Fix Trail Mix Snack Bars to One-Pan Chicken Parmesan with Spinach, you’ll enjoy night after night of delicious home cooking–without any of the hassle. Satisfy your whole family with nourishing meals they’ll love with CLEAN EATING FOR BUSY FAMILIES.


Chef Brooke Williamson’s Perfect Plate of BBQ

This story was produced in partnership with Kroger’s® Private Selection® and Simple Truth® ingredients for the Perfect BBQ.

This summer, Chef Brooke Williamson showed us some of her favorite dishes for the perfect BBQ. The Top-Chef winner, business owner, and mom knows the importance of sharing a meal that is suitable for all tastes while using elevated ingredients for a sensational experience. That’s why she works with Kroger’s® Private Selection® and Simple Truth® ingredients to create a Perfect BBQ. We sat down with Brooke between takes to discuss the perfect BBQ, a fear of heights, and how she got her kid to try something other than chicken fingers.

For you, what is the perfect plate of BBQ?

Variety. Definitely. I like a very balanced plate of food, and that doesn’t mean four separate meals on one plate, but I do want a sweet and a sour, a rich and an acidic. I like to hit all the notes. But to me, just a hot dog with all the fixings – ketchup and mustard and relish and onions…that can totally be a balanced plate of BBQ on its own.

Is there a cooking style or cuisine that you are partial to or originally inspired you, and why?

I would say that being born and raised in Los Angeles, produce inspires me more than anything. I would say that California cuisine is what it is because produce is so prevalent and sort of the king of ingredients here. (Editor’s Note: check out Brooke’s take on veggie-forward BBQ sides)

What talent would you most like to have that you don’t currently possess?

I would love to be able to play an instrument. My son plays the piano and I’m so jealous of his abilities. He inspires me. Or Flying. (laughter) Flying an airplane, because I’m so massively afraid of heights that I feel like maybe that would help me get over it. So, yeah. Piano and airplanes.

So many foods, particularly vegetables, had a bad rap but are seeing such a resurgence. Suddenly people are like “oh brussel sprouts are good!”

My son’s favorite vegetable.

If you told me that in 1989, I would have said that’s insane. Do you think it’s because like…our parents’ generation just… didn’t know how to cook?

My mom was a great cook, but I also think that she followed basic recipes. That is kind of what you did in the eighties. Now perhaps, people feel a bit more liberty to impart their own thoughts and ideas into their food. (Editor’s Note: Check Out Brooke’s spin on BBQ classics) I think that the realization that produce is sometimes better when left alone came to fruition, so now their’s some more personal liberty to practice some personal likes and dislikes.

Are there any lessons you’ve learned cooking for a family that carries over into your professional kitchens? Or Vice Versa?

My home life and my, my business life doesn’t have a line of separation, you know? So the way that my brain works in the kitchen is the way my brain works in the kitchen. I think a lot of my structure, technique, and follow-through in the home kitchen is very similar at work.

So, like, you have a little ticket rack for tracking orders in your home kitchen?

No! Ha, but I try to cook with variety so if there’s part of a meal that doesn’t particularly appeal to someone, there are other options there. And I think that has been the best way to get my son to be open-minded about food – to provide options for him to decide for himself. You know multiple choices that aren’t chicken tenders. And it’s also sort of my responsibility to guide my customers to new dishes, without them feeling like I’m trying to educate them.

Are there any awesome healthy alternatives to kid-favorite dishes you are partial to?

We try to eat healthy at home because we eat out a lot. So we try to balance dining out and junk food by making a rule of not having a lot of junk in the house. But you can’t keep a kid from eating chocolate chip cookies all the time. There are concessions you make, and you find the balance somewhere else. I made this one that’s a total 180 of a classic kid food, which is chocolate pudding. I used Simple Truth Organic™ Hass Avocado. That’s an incredibly specific swap out. (Editor’s Note: She made it for us, and it checks out. Find the recipe here.)

You’re a renowned chef, a business owner, and the youngest woman to cook at the James Beard House…a lot of accolades. But what is the hardest you’ve ever bombed?

I mean, just because I have all those qualifications on my resume doesn’t mean that I’m a master at anything. I fall on my face all the time! And when I fall hard, that’s when I learned the biggest lessons. I don’t have anything specific that stands out because, because I don’t take my failures to heart, you know? Even with what’s going on in the world, with the pandemic and restaurants struggling…my son actually asked me why I became a chef, because it seems so much harder than what his friends’ parents do. It seems like we’re constantly trying to figure out what to do next. And, you know, we don’t have a stable lifestyle or the huge house, or the knowledge of, you know, what next month is going to look like. But I wouldn’t trade my life for anything else in the world, because it’s what makes me happy. And if I hadn’t become a chef, I wouldn’t have met my husband. I wouldn’t have my son. So I think the biggest lesson that I’ve learned is to just sort of take everything in stride and, and know that there’s always a way to change the outcome. If I were to like fester on one specific instance where I’ve failed miserably, then I feel like I wouldn’t be able to move on.

You just burned your hand on the stove. What’s your go-to curse word?

Do you actually say “flour” or are you censoring yourself because we’re a parenting brand?

It depends on how painful the burn is! I had a line cook in like the early 2000s and it was an open kitchen so he would say “mother flower” every time he was mad about something. To this day -and it actually has very little to do with having a kid because he hears me swear all the time — but if I’m just really frustrated, the first thing that comes to my mind is “mother flour.”

As a Mom Chef, what is the best meal you’ve made for your family?

You know what? I’m, I’m actually most happy with myself when something is perfectly seasoned and cooked properly. So like, it doesn’t really matter what I’m cooking. If I brine a pork tenderloin for the perfect number of hours or if a marinade for steak has that perfect balance….Cause I don’t really measure anything. So it’s kind of always a crapshoot. If I execute perfectly, then I’m pretty satisfied. But if I can do something well, that’s what makes me satisfied.

Chef Brooke showed us some of her favorite BBQ dishes and sides the whole family will love using her favorite ingredients from Private Selection® and Simple Truth®. Private Selection® is a collection of select ingredients that elevate any dish into an experience to savor. Simple Truth® provides all-natural ingredients for fresh creations suitable for any diet. You can check out more of our work with Chef Brooke here, and be sure to elevate your summer BBQ’s with Kroger’s® Private Selection® and Simple Truth® .


What does Jamie Oliver eat for breakfast?

Looks like the star chef is pretty healthy when it comes to the first meal of the day.

On his website, he shares a recipe for his wife Jools' granola, saying: "Granola is a great way to enjoy all the different types of dried fruits, nuts and seeds that you might not otherwise get in your diet," adding, "Granola is also the perfect portable breakfast."

Jamie recommends eggs for breakfast

He's also a fan of eggs for brekkie. Posting a clip of a boiled egg on his Instagram page, Jamie wrote: "Bank holiday weekend starts now!! Who's having eggs this morning?"


Cooking During COVID-19: Family Meals And Fantasies Of Future Dinner Parties

The resurgence of family meals is one of the "precious few good things" that's come from the COVID-19 pandemic, says food writer Sam Sifton.

As billions of people around the world face stay-at-home orders because of COVID-19, family dinners — and breakfasts and lunches — are resurgent. Former New York Times food editor Sam Sifton calls the shift to family meals one of the "precious few good things" happening as a result of the pandemic.

"A lot of us are really experiencing the joys of eating together with family regularly," he says. "For me, it's been kind of joyful amid all the sorrow."

A Cookbook for Family and Friends

by Sam Sifton , David Malosh and Simon Andrews

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Sifton was recently promoted to be The Times' assistant managing editor, overseeing its culture and lifestyle coverage, but he continues to write about food and its role in helping people cope with the isolation of the pandemic. His new cookbook, See You on Sunday, was inspired by the idea that regularly gathering and feeding friends and family is psychologically and spiritually nourishing.

"We're gathering for the purpose of sustenance, for the purpose of an almost literal communion," he says. "If you do that regularly enough, you'll see a change in your relationship to both the cooking and the people — and perhaps see a change in yourself and how you regard the world."

Sifton emphasizes that now is not the time for dinner parties. Instead, he's staying home, enjoying meals with his own nuclear family — and fantasizing about the other side of the pandemic, when he can safely host a big Sunday dinner. His ideal post-coronavirus feast? A giant pot of steamed clams.

"Everyone crowded together around it when it's done, shoulders touching and people reaching over one another to get at the drawn butter and tearing off pieces of bread to dip into the broth," he says. "That's gonna be joyous when that happens."

Interview highlights

On how people are cooking both adventurously and pragmatically during the pandemic

Sam Sifton's new cookbook, See You on Sunday, promotes the spiritual benefit of eating with friends and family. The New York Times hide caption

Sam Sifton's new cookbook, See You on Sunday, promotes the spiritual benefit of eating with friends and family.

This may be a time to be more adventurous. It's also, conversely, a time to be simple. At The New York Times and NYT Cooking (our recipe site and app), we're seeing that play out in real time in what people are searching for and what people are asking us about. You see people, on the one hand, trying to perfect their sourdough bread-making skills, and on the other asking for what the simplest, easiest way to get a can of beans on the table to feed the family is.

And I think that's kind of neat, actually, that we can hold these two things in our minds at once. These projects that we'll try and execute over the course of hours and days and then also: How am I going to do this fast and quick and cheap and with what's available? And I hope we can deliver answers to both.

On improvising with limited pantry items

I rely on these jarred magical potions — which range from peanut butter, to pickled chilies, to soy sauce, to maple syrup — to deliver notes of flavor on top of whatever plain-Jane things happen to be in the bottom of the refrigerator crisper.

I think it depends what's in the pantry. . I'm not like a lot of my colleagues [who] are a true chef. I'm a pretty good cook and I can follow any recipe you throw at me. I could work for a chef, but I can't kind of close my eyes and conjure up amazing combinations and flavors as someone like [food columnist] Melissa Clark can do for The New York Times. Instead, I rely on these jarred magical potions — which range from peanut butter, to pickled chilies, to soy sauce, to maple syrup — to deliver notes of flavor on top of whatever plain-Jane things happen to be in the bottom of the refrigerator crisper. . And sometimes it doesn't work.

On being open to substitutions

I think that many people — me included — write recipes, because if you follow them, you will get the result that I got and that I want you to get. But if you substitute along the way, you may end up with something that you like — and that's even better. We joke about this a lot at The Times . about people who say, "I tried the chicken, but I didn't have chicken, so I used sardines, and this is a terrible recipe." Your mileage may vary. But using the spices that you have or the flavors that you have on hand is more than perfectly all right. It's welcome. It's what we ought to do. It's in the nature of cooking often and being confident about what it is you're doing.

The Salt

In 'Appetites,' Bourdain Pleases The Toughest Food Critic (His 9-Year-Old)

On the versatility of tinned fish

I'm loving the tinned fish right now. There's so many different things that you can do with those critters. If they're anchovies, I would use them like a condiment. They add this kind of salty umami pop to everything. I like sardines on crackers with a little mayonnaise and a little hot sauce. . With tuna, there's so much you can do, particularly if the tuna is of good quality, then it can kind of stand on its own. If it's not, if it's just supermarket canned tuna, it's still pretty great. You mix it into a tuna salad with a little mayo, maybe with some curry powder if you have some going, a curried tuna salad is really terrific. .

I find those canned fishes of all varieties to be hugely helpful in the manner of bringing variety to your diet and also a lot of good taste. I bet you, if you look deep enough, there may be a can of minced clams in the back [of the cupboard], and add that to a tomato sauce and spaghetti dinner is all the better this time for that addition.

On shopping infrequently because of the virus, and looking for ingredients that stretch

I try to go as infrequently as possible to the market to stock up, and when I do, I try not to shop like a panicky person. But I do want meals that stretch.

I think that we should be getting out to shop as little as possible. I think social distancing means . that we shouldn't all be crowding into the store every night as if we were living in an imaginary Paris to pick up our daily baguette and a couple of duck legs for dinner. Life isn't like that right now. I try to go as infrequently as possible to the market to stock up, and when I do, I try not to shop like a panicky person. But I do want meals that stretch. If I can find a pork shoulder that can become four meals over the course of a week, well, that's great. If I can land starches and grains to put next to those various pork dishes, I'm happy. .

We're cooking with a lot of cabbage right now. I think that's because I like cabbage for its ability to be many things, including once you get rid of those outer leaves . you've got all that tender, fresh, clean, perfect cabbage flesh inside that makes a beautiful, crunchy, raw deliciousness thing on your plate at a time when sometimes fresh vegetables are few and far between.

On how the pandemic has impacted the restaurant industry


The 30-Day Healthy Eating Challenge

Trying to get your family's diet back on track? With our 30-Day Healthy Eating Challenge, your crew is just one month away from better eating habits!

It&aposs summertime and the livin&apos is easy, so now&aposs the perfect time (since you&aposve got more time!) to start eating healthier as a family. Our Healthy Eating Challenge features a month&aposs worth of smart but totally doable habits, from adding an extra serving of veggies to your daily diet toਏocusing on eating a "rainbow" of colorful foods. Every day and every change is designed to make families healthier. Want to join the adventure? Take part on social media with the hashtag, #HealthyEatingChallenge and share your success stories as you go.

Cook with your kids: Invite your kids into the kitchen to help with meal prep. Even something as simple as a snack of sliced veggies with Easy Homemade Hummus can set kids up for a lifetime of healthful eating. Kids love hands-on activities, and cooking is no exception. Things might get messy, but just think of all the fun you&aposll have with a tiny sous chef or two by your side. Need ideas? Check out theseꀳ Recipes to Cook with Kids.

Add਎xtraਏiber to your diet: Does your family get the recommended 25 to 38 grams of fiber each day (19 grams for 1 to 3 year olds)? Fiber is good for digestion and keeps blood sugar in check, but despite the benefits, most people don&apost consume enough. Boost your intake with਎veryday foods like 1/3 cup canned black beans, 1/3 cup almonds, 1 cup broccoli, 1 small pear, or half of a medium-size avocado.

Start your day with a serving of fruit: Before you butter your toast or pour a bowl of breakfast cereal, eat some fruit. You&aposll get one step closer to the recommended 1.5 cups daily for women ages 31-50. Try a bowl of mixed berries, juicy orange sections, a wedge of watermelon, or a banana. Heck, a quarter cup of dried cranberries even counts. This "fruit first" approach is delicious, nutritious, and best of all, it&aposs easy.

DAY 4Shop your local farmers&apos market: Do your kids know where carrots come from? Have they ever tried a fresh-picked watermelon radish? Take your family to the farmers&apos market to sample fresh produce plucked straight from the farm, and let everyone pick a new fruit or vegetable to bring home. To make your trip਎ven more of an adventure, download this Farmers&apos Market Scavenger Hunt.

Start a container garden: Are you a green thumb, or does everything you plant literally wither at the vine? Now&aposs your chance to find success as a back-yard gardener with a simple container garden. Start small with a flower pot, some soil, and fragrant herbs like rosemary, thyme, basil, and parsley𠅊nd invite your kids to help with planting, watering, snipping, and incorporating your bounty into recipes like this basil-topped Double P Pizza.

DAY 6Eat ugly produce: Did you know that 40 percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes to waste? There are numerous reasons why food gets tossed, and being ugly is one of them. Show misshapen tomatoes and gnarly carrots some respect by purchasing ugly produce. To learn more, check out the Ugly Fruit and Vegetable Campaign.

DAY 7Replace sports drinks with plain &aposol water: What&aposs your favorite way to quench a thirst? A 20-ounce sports drink can have 8 or more teaspoons of added sugar, so water is your best bet. To make it more flavorful and interesting, fill a pitcher or re-usable bottle with water and then doctor it up with cucumber slices and mint, citrus slices, or a mix of fresh berries. Chill and have at the ready for a delicious flavor-infused sip.

DAY 8Grocery shop with a list: Get in the habit of shopping with an aisle-by-aisle list to avoid impulse purchases or last-minute trips to the supermarket for forgotten items. Spend an hour򠺬h week planning meals and taking stock of what&aposs already on hand in your pantry, and then check off only the ingredients you need. You&aposll save time and money.

Eat More Pulses: Beans, dry peas, lentils, and chickpeas are affordable, versatile, sustainable, and they&aposre packed with fiber and protein. Put pulses on your table with homemade chili brimming with kidney or pinto beans try savory split pea soup buy a tub of hummus (it&aposs made with chickpeas!) or toss a salad with a yummy salad dressing (we recommend Ken&aposs new Simply Vinaigrette line) and top it with cooked lentils.

Self-serve dinner: Serve dinner family style in large bowls and platters so everyone at your table can pick and choose what appeals to their taste buds and appetites. It&aposs fun for kids to follow the lead of adults and older siblings by serving themselves. Pre-plating may be a bit less fussy, but it "tells" a child what and how much they "should" be eating versus listening to their own tummies.

Skip Dessert After Dinner: Add a sweet ending to the evening meal by taking a family walk, tossing a ball in the back yard, or playing a board game. Or start a new dessert tradition by setting out a festive fruit and nut platter filled with sliced apples, pears, dried apricots, and crunchy toasted walnuts or pecans.

Make a Green Smoothie Bowl: Swap your kids&apos usual smoothies with a gorgeous green smoothie bowl. Fill a blender with plain yogurt, orange juice, frozen sliced bananas, chia seeds, green or golden kiwifruit, and a handful of baby spinach or kale. Decorate the top with coconut chips and fruit (it&aposs a work of art), and serve with a spoon. No straw required!

Day 13Eat good bacteria: Trillions of good bacteria live in your gut and play a role in everything from regulating your immune system to the health of your brain. (Fun fact: If you lined up your good bacteria end to end, they&aposd reach the moon!) Keep your gut in tip-top shape by adding one or more bacteria-rich fermented foods to your diet including yogurt, kefir, fresh pickles, or kimchee.

DAY 14Set up a build-your-own bar for dinner: If you thought Legos and blocks were fun, you&aposll love this new way to ring in the dinner hour. With build-your-own dinners, everyone in the family can customize the evening entre to their liking. Try it with pizzas, tacos, twice-baked potatoes, pasta, and protein bowls.

DAY 15Try a new recipe for dinner: Enjoy a taste adventure by trying a new recipe for an entree your family already loves. Grilled chicken for dinner again? Why not take that bird to Mexico and serve with a fresh salsa, or taste travel to Italy by topping grilled chicken with capers and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Here are a few more chicken dinners to try.

DAY 16Make half of your grains whole grain: Add the nutty flavors of brown rice or whole grain bread to your menus today. Make sure that half of your grain food choices are made with whole grains. Add whole grain pastas and crackers to your pantry and discover whole grain side dishes such as quinoa or wild rice blend.

DAY 17Try one new vegetable: Plant a new vegetable on your family menu by discovering the taste of a veggie you might not have tried before or haven&apost purchased in a long time. Kohlrabi is a farmers&apos market darling that you can slice and serve with a dip. Sliced radishes add crunch and a refreshing peppery note to tossed salads. And why not roast a whole butternut squash, dice it up, and add to the salad, too?

DAY 18Read the food label: Federal law requires that every packaged food contain a Nutrition Facts panel complete with calories, sodium, saturated fat, nutrients like calcium and iron, and more. Put your sleuthing skills to the test by reading the label on every packaged food you eat for the day. You may be surprised how quickly some of those numbers add up.

DAY 19Eat a rainbow: Eat produce in every color of the rainbow today. Color is a cue for health-promoting phytonutrients inside fruits and vegetables𠅊nd typically the darker the better. So choose a variety of vibrantly hued produce to add to your plate today, from bright orange sweet potatoes and deep green spinach to colorful berries, cherries, and grapes. White produce counts too, so add a few "clouds" to your rainbow with mushrooms, onions, or cauliflower.

DAY 20Try one new fruit: Branch out of your typical fruit rotation and go a little tropical. Try mangos, papaya, or passion fruit in a fruit salad or blended into a smoothie or smoothie bowl. Or slice up a starfruit and delight your kids with a star-shared snack. If your kids aren&apost quite as adventurous, simply try a familiar fruit in a different color: Swap a golden kiwi for the usual green, or buy yellow cherries instead of red.

DAY 21Get a new kitchen gadget: Streamline dinner prep by introducing a new gadget or small appliance—you may discover new family favorites enabled by the equipment. Splurge on an Instant Pot, try a spirializer, or get a mini food processor to make your own hummus, pesto, and salsas. An apple corer, cherry pitter, mango cutter, or pineapple corer can make it easier to eat more fruit.

DAY 22Go meatless: Join the Meatless Monday movementਊnd build your meals around plant-based foods instead of meat. It&aposs good for your health𠅊nd the planet&aposs!਌heck out convenient meat alternatives at the market, including burgers and ground meat substitutes, and use them for veggie tacos, spaghetti sauce, or lasagna. Or make vegetable-forward meals, such as cauliflower "steak," a bean-filled chili, or a pizza topped with mozzarella and vegetables.

DAY 23Shop in the center aisle of the supermarket: That&aposs right, no need to only stick to the perimeter of the grocery store. You&aposll find lots of convenient and wholesome options in those center aisles𠄿rom canned beans, canned pumpkin, and boneless skinless salmon to hearty soups (watch the sodium), whole wheat pasta, oats, nuts, and super seeds like chia, sunflower, flax, and hemp.

DAY 24Plan your weekly meals with your kids: Be the captain of the kitchen today by enlisting your tiny troops to help with meal planning. You set the rules—healthy at least one veggie with dinner something easy—then get busy prepping and cooking. When kids get a say in &aposwhat&aposs for dinner,&apos they&aposre more likely to get excited about trying new foods.

DAY 25Try a new veggie preparation: Steamed vegetables can get ho hum after a while, so shake up your veggie repertoire by playing around with different veggie preparations. Roast cauliflower and broccoli florets serve less familiar vegetables like radishes, kohlrabi, and snow peas with a Greek yogurt dip or a drizzle of a dressing (one of Ken&aposs Simply Vinaigrettes would work here, too) make sweet potato chips and fill a grill basket with mushrooms, sweet potato wedges, and colorful diced bell peppers.

DAY 26Eat Mindfully: Slow down and savor the flavor, aroma, colors, and texture of every bite, and unplug from TVs and cell phones. Eating mindfully fosters a healthy relationship with food�use it helps to reduce overeating and binge eating. So challenge everyone at your table tonight to chew each bite a few extra times and pause between forkfuls. Just think of all the extra time you&aposll have for engaging conversation.

DAY 27Eat together as a family: Thirty percent of families eat together every night. Let&aposs get to 100 percent today by sitting down to a delicious family dinner! The benefits to children of shared family meals include everything from improved eating habits and a healthier body weight to stronger academic performance in school. Make mealtime more manageable by planning ahead, being creative (a picnic at the park totally counts!), assigning kitchen tasks to every member of the family, and placing a realistic limit on evening activities. And speaking of planning, how about one of these 30 Minutes-Max Dinners tonight?

DAY 28Nix packaged snack foods: Unless, of course, it&aposs a package of nuts, dried fruit, or a whole grain like popcorn. Packaged snack foods are often a red flag that what you&aposre buying contains a lot of sodium, saturated fat, sugar, and hard-to-pronounce ingredients. Commit to a whole-foods approach to snacking with fresh fruit, veggies served with hummus, homemade trail mix, or baked corn chips with homemade guacamole.

DAY 29Replace (some) white flour with whole wheat: The next time you bake up a batch of muffins or gather ingredients for pancakes, consider replacing a quarter to half of the all-purpose flour with whole wheat flour or whole wheat pastry flour. Whole wheat flour has more fiber and nutrients like folate and B vitamins. Baked goods made with whole wheat flour will be heavier and denser, so start slow and experiment as you go. You may need to add a few extra tablespoons of liquid to compensate.

DAY 30Say goodbye to soft drinks: Today is your day to go cold turkey on soft drinks. Swap sugar-sweetened beverages for a homemade fizzy drink made with seltzer water with 100% orange, grape, or pomegranate juice.

Liz Weiss, MS, RDN is a mom of two with a specialty in family nutrition. She&aposs the voice behind the family food blog and podcast, Liz&aposs Healthy Table and author of the playful new coloring book series, Color, Cook, Eat!


41 Royal Family Food Rules You Had No Idea They Have To Abide By

Besides the no garlic thing. Everyone knows that by now.

We know what all the royals actually eat in a day, but how they do it is a bit more of a mystery. Besides the formal engagements we see all of them at, there are tons of super strict royal protocols around eating and food. Here are just a few of them.

It's no secret that the royals love tea, but Prince Charles likes his done in a very particular way. Dumfries Houses&rsquos hospitality manager Evan Samson told the Sunday Times that Charles likes his made with loose tea leaves in a teapot, with the ratio being one teaspoon of leaves per each cup of tea, plus one for the pot, according to Express. For green tea, the water should be heated to 70C degrees Celsius and it should be 100 degrees Celsius for Earl Grey. He also loves organic honey added straight to the teapot and the cups arranged just so with a teaspoon under the handle.

The Queen has a rule about how many dinner guests are allowed to sit at the table. The number of guests has to be either more or less than 13, but never exactly 13. The Queen herself isn't necessarily superstitious about the notoriously "unlucky" number, but she's aware of the connotations it has in other cultures so she's sure to never have 13 people sitting around the dinner table.


10 Celebrities with Plant-Based Diets

When Beyoncé tried out a vegan diet, the world took notice. Let’s be honest: when Beyoncé does anything, the world takes notice. Anyone who has millions of followers and looks good in hot pants months after birthing twins will command attention in a grander way than – er – the rest of us.

Plant-based celebrities can snowball interest in vegan or vegetarian lifestyles. They might be the spark that lights the flame that becomes an environmentally and health conscious person. This person might even have the opportunity to pull hot pants out from the back of their closet to see if it might not be too late for shorts with sequins on them.

Ariana Grande

This vocal powerhouse follows a macrobiotic vegan diet, loving daikon, lotus and adzuki beans. Grande shared this statement about her way of eating: “I love animals more than I love most people, not kidding. But I am a firm believer in eating a full plant-based, whole food diet that can expand your life length and make you an all-around happier person.”

Natalie Portman

Portman has a self-described, “clean, vegan diet” which includes things like oatmeal or avocado toast for breakfast, vegan Mexican food for lunch and a couscous or pasta based dish for dinner. Her husband loves to cook for her and she admits she is, “very, very lucky.”

Jenna Dewan

The gorgeous World of Dance host eats only plant-based foods, claiming that she prefers to stick to a balanced diet so that she doesn’t have to restrict her eating. Her vegan vice is French fries and she believes that, “We have become so off-balance with our animal consumption. Even one meatless meal a week helps!”

Ellen DeGeneres

It isn’t surprising that the celebrity with the tagline “Be kind to one another!” is vegan. Shunning animal products since 2009, she once told Oprah, “ I felt better about myself, and I felt healthier living in a cruelty-free way. I haven’t been sick since, I am not as tired, and I’ve lost weight.”

Jared Leto

The Hollywood actor who never ages calls himself a “cheagan” or a cheating vegan. Mostly plant-based, his exceptions include, “if someone’s mom made a cookie and handed it to me, I’d probably take a bite, or if I’m in Alaska and there’s wild salmon out of the river, I’d probably eat it.”

Mike Tyson

Tyson credits veganism with helping him lose 140 pounds and getting in fighting trim shape and fighting his inner demons. His strict vegan bodybuilding diet inspires other alpha athletes to follow suit.

Steve-O

The Jack-ass star may be the last person you expect to adhere to a plant-based lifestyle. Now involved with the Farm Sanctuary, Steve-O has no interest in standing on a soap box, but “just tries to tell people how I have personally benefited from the vegan lifestyle.”

Betty White

This Golden Girl has been an animal lover long before it was chic. For her 93rd birthday she celebrated with a vegan cake. She has been known to do things like adopt a crocodile in honor of Elton John’s birthday. She says she could, “never imagine eating a best friend.”

Questlove

The Roots Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson recently went vegan in an attempt to overhaul his health and extend his life expectancy. After switching to plant-based eating, Questlove said, “ “I want to be the first member of the hip-hop generation to live past 60.

Bruce Springsteen

In his 60’s, Springsteen still dives into crowds and performs three hour long sets. One of his “secrets” is assumed to be the mostly vegetarian diet which keeps him feeling vibrant and young.

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