New recipes

New York City's Gallow Green Launches Menu Inspired by Its New Wood-Burning Pizza Oven

New York City's Gallow Green Launches Menu Inspired by Its New Wood-Burning Pizza Oven


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

If you haven’t been to Gallow Green, the rooftop bar and garden oasis, located at The McKittrick Hotel, you need to go immediately. This is one of my favorite rooftops thanks to its lush, freely growing greenery, flowers, weathered wooden benches, and tea lights that decorate the space. The atmosphere is classy, relaxing, and down-right magical on a nice summer night.

Gallow Green has just launched a special menu featuring its new wood-burning pizza oven. Pizza, rooftops, and craft cocktails are three things that New Yorkers love, and lucky for us, this chic spot now offers all three.

Highlights of the new pizza menu include the classic with mozzarella and option to add pepperoni; Tunisian, topped with Merguez sausage, eggplant, feta and scallions ― this one I highly recommend if you’re an eggplant fan; and veggie options like wood-fired mushroom, which comes with a blend of seasonal mushrooms, baby kale, Cheddar curd and Taleggio cheeses; vibrant zucchini with squash blossom, heirloom cherry tomato, fresh ricotta, and opal basil; and a unique cauliflower option, a Middle Eastern-inspired pie with tahini, lemon, parsley, za’atar and a kick of spice from chile flakes.

Aside from the pizzas, a new seasonal dinner menu is also served daily. Now, I don’t normally order a bowl of raw vegetables, but Gallow Green’s crudité bowl is actually one of the most beautiful dishes I have ever seen. Filled with colorful seasonal vegetables, house-made tapenade, and ramp goddess dressing for dipping, this bowl is akin to a rainbow — in vegetable form.

Other tasty bites include the charcuterie board, featuring cured meats from La Quercia and chicken liver and foie gras mousse made in house, as well as lighter veggie plates such as grilled asparagus topped with a soft poached egg, pancetta and dandelion greens; roasted carrots with kale, red quinoa, and yogurt dressing; and fried squash blossom, stuffed with jumbo lump crab.

Fresh seafood and meat selections include yellow fin tuna crudo, lamb meatballs, and mini lobster rolls, to name a few choices.

As I mentioned previously, the cocktails here are on point. To pair with the new offerings are seasonal cocktails include Something Wicked, a take on a Matador made with Sauza Hornitos tequila, fresh pineapple, and peri peri and tamarind-infused agave; Fresh Cut, a refreshing combination of Banks rum with cucumber, epazote leaves, and a hint of chartreuse; A Rose by Any Other Name, rye mixed with a rooibos and rosehip tea blend and fresh lemon; and Sleep No More, made with Vida mezcal, house-made seasonal berry shrub and ginger beer for the summer. I recommend the Fresh Cut if you’re a fan of refreshing, cooling cocktails.

Definitely swing by if you’re in the Chelsea area; come winter, Green Gallow transforms in to a whole new Narnia-esque wonderland.

For more New York City dining and travel news, click here.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


The United States of Pizza: The Best Pizza From Each of the 50 States

They say pizza’s like sex—that even bad pizza is still, well, pizza. “And pizza’s never bad” the thinking goes, right? Maybe. It makes me suspicious that whoever first said that actually hadn’t had very much sex, very good sex, or, for that matter, good pizza. In the quest for America’s best, I’ve had pretty average—and at times downright bad—slices that’ve made me wish I’d swiped left on them. But I've also held out for pies cooked to perfection by pizzaiolos across the nation, at places I’ve had long, torrid affairs with.

But, you never know, right? That place you doubted might serve a slice of heaven. That three-hour wait could match the hype. So, over the years, I’ve collected every pizza tome, read every list, talked to and polled local and national experts, made detours on vacation and business trips, and spent weekends and nights after work, researching pizza, tasting pizza, and compiling lists of America’s best pizza for my friends, myself, and various publications. Truth is, there’s so much good pizza these days, finding the best is more difficult than ever. That’s why we’re here to assist you in your journey.

Some pizza questing principles bear explaining first, though. Keeping in mind the most obvious, “a line is a good sign,” call these the 10 commandments of seeking out great pizza. Okay, 15. (Let’s pretend Pizza Moses didn’t drop that third tablet.) The following core principles held true while researching America's best pies:

1. Believe in tradition but also in defying tradition for a transformative pizza.
2. A plain cheese pizza always establishes a baseline.
3. The way sausage, pepperoni, and mushroom pies are made all say a lot.
4. Signature pies, crazy toppings, bizarre topping combinations, and various styles at a pizzeria should always be sampled, but guarantee nothing.
5. Fancy pizza isn’t necessarily great pizza.
6. Pizzerias don’t always know their best pies.
7. You can’t completely judge a pie by delivery, but you can judge how well a pizza is delivered.
8. No slice is too big and no price is too big, but the bigger and more expensive the pizza beyond conventional standards, the less likely it is to be good.
9. There’s nothing okay about a $1 slice.
10. When it comes to slice joints, always be skeptical of a reheat but not dogmatic about refusing one.
11. The more toppings there are, the less likely it is, on average, to be a great pie.
12. Deep-dish is technically a casserole, but yes, it’s still pizza, and it can be great, but that’s not the only pizza style in Chicago.
13. There are great pizza styles beyond those in New York, New Haven, and Chicago worth trying across this great country.
14. The Neapolitan wave may have gone too far, too long.
15. New Yorkers may be too cocky about pizza.

Rules and regulations served on the ivory paper plates of pizz-academia have their time and place. But ultimately they are here to serve you: to support your nationwide journey following the t he siren song of ronicups curling, the sound of sauce bubbling, and melted cheese crisping. After all, great pizza is about exploring sauce coastlines, testing the limits of untested cheese pulls, catching a glance of that perfect leopard spotting, or finding that ultimate pizzeria where there is no cornicione left behind.


Watch the video: Gallow Green, NYCs Best Rooftop Bar (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Chien

    Completely I share your opinion. It is good idea. It is ready to support you.

  2. Bahn

    A person expands the Path, and not the Path expands a person ...

  3. Addaneye

    Said in confidence, my opinion is then evident. Try searching google.com for the answer to your question

  4. Drugi

    Great message, I like it :)



Write a message