New recipes

At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs

At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs

A restaurant review from Jonathan Gold of the LA Times

The Turkish-ish breakfast at Kismet features a variety of small plates.

I once spent a week tailing the band Hanson, three teenage boys who had grown up on an island where the only pop available to them was from Time Life rock ’n’ roll anthologies, 1957-69. And the music they made reflected it — their songs were the products of people who had thought deeply about Bobby Darin but had never heard Led Zeppelin or LL Cool J. And sometimes I think about Hanson when I’m sitting down to dinner at Kismet, the new quasi-Middle Eastern restaurant on Los Feliz’s southern edge.

It’s not because the sleek dining room is old-fashioned — the plant-filled Midcentury Modern groove could not be more present-day Los Angeles — or because its customers, who all look like recent Wesleyan grads, are anything less than yoga-toned and chic. The menu, surpassingly light and vegetable-intensive, has the carefully layered flavors, the touches of heat, tartness and herbal intensity that we have grown to expect from the best new kitchens. The aesthetic of co-chefs Sara Kramer and Sarah Hymanson, whom you may know from Madcapra in Grand Central Market if not from their former restaurant Glasserie out by Brooklyn’s Pulaski Bridge, is up-to-date.

Read the rest of the review on the LA Times.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Surfair

This month, we’re all about rethinking travel and you can’t go anywhere without having something to eat. Luckily, the Los Angeles food scene is a multicultural force to be reckoned with. And while anyone can happily survive on tacos and sushi—why not try something new? We looked to L.A.’s most trusted source, Sir Jonathan Gold, food critic for the Los Angeles Times, for a few choice ways to rethink your next meal in town.

Cassia, Santa Monica

Starting with the west side, Cassia, led by chef Bryant Ng, creates a beautiful union between Vietnamese flavors and French cooking. Dishes come with ample rewards from both worlds, particularly in items like the pot-au-feu, charcuterie plate, and white peppered crab.

Gold says: “Maybe the best thing you can eat at Cassia is the flatbread… a dish that seems to encapsulate L.A.’s culinary moment, the erasure of boundaries between expense-account dining and street food.”

Odys + Penelope, MidCity

Brought to you by Quinn and Karen Hatfield (formerly of Hatfield’s), the restaurant named for a mythological romance is at once vast and intimately inviting. Exposed brick and wooden rafters hover around the minimalist dining room. For food, try the grilled branzino with braised leeks, or small plates like the fried wild mushrooms and smoked lamb lettuce cups. If room, also opt for the donuts.

Gold says: “I always admired Hatfield’s. Odys + Penelope I actually love.”

Make a point to head to the eastside at least once, if not for the culture then for Kismet. The sleek and smallish Middle Eastern-style spot tucked quietly off Hollywood Boulevard keeps us coming back for the great service and the jeweled crispy rice, amongst others.

Gold says: “At Kismet, your culinary destiny may come in the form of rabbit kebabs.”

An exterior view of the entrance to Kismet, Los Feliz

Surf Air is an air charter broker and does not own or operate any aircraft. Surf Air arranges travel and other services solely as a manager of the Surf Air membership program and as an agent of its membership. All flights arranged by Surf Air for its members are performed by independent, third party FAA-licensed and DOT-registered air carriers.


Watch the video: Κουνέλι για κατοικίδιο!! SOS Τι πρέπει να προσέξω στην διατροφή του;; (December 2021).